Pauls Letters to the Corinthians: The Mind of Christ

From http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1+Corinthians+2&version=NIV

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PAULS LETTERS TO THE CORINTHIANS

1 Corinthians 2 (written 2000 years ago!)

1 And so it was with me, brothers and sisters. When I came to you, I did not come with eloquence or human wisdom as I proclaimed to you the testimony about God.[a] 2 For I resolved to know nothing while I was with you except Jesus Christ and him crucified. 3 I came to you in weakness with great fear and trembling. 4 My message and my preaching were not with wise and persuasive words, but with a demonstration of the Spirit’s power, 5 so that your faith might not rest on human wisdom, but on God’s power.

God’s Wisdom Revealed by the Spirit

6 We do, however, speak a message of wisdom among the mature, but not the wisdom of this age or of the rulers of this age, who are coming to nothing. 7 No, we declare God’s wisdom, a mystery that has been hidden and that God destined for our glory before time began. 8 None of the rulers of this age understood it, for if they had, they would not have crucified the Lord of glory. 9 However, as it is written:

   “What no eye has seen,
what no ear has heard,
and what no human mind has conceived”[b]
the things God has prepared for those who love him—

10 these are the things God has revealed to us by his Spirit.

The Spirit searches all things, even the deep things of God. 11 For who knows a person’s thoughts except their own spirit within them? In the same way no one knows the thoughts of God except the Spirit of God. 12 What we have received is not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit who is from God, so that we may understand what God has freely given us. 13 This is what we speak, not in words taught us by human wisdom but in words taught by the Spirit, explaining spiritual realities with Spirit-taught words.[c] 14 The person without the Spirit does not accept the things that come from the Spirit of God but considers them foolishness, and cannot understand them because they are discerned only through the Spirit. 15 The person with the Spirit makes judgments about all things, but such a person is not subject to merely human judgments, 16 for,

“Who has known the mind of the Lord
so as to instruct him?”[d]

But we have the mind of Christ.

   “What no eye has seen,
what no ear has heard,
and what no human mind has conceived”[b]
the things God has prepared for those who love him—

From http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1+Corinthians+2&version=NIV

THE BIG QUESTION: What does GOD mean to YOU?

“I experience God as an eternal loving creative presence within the world and in my own life, My belief My belief in God provides me with a framework for how I view humanity and the earth, God for me is found in the middle of daily life, in all the joys and struggles of people. It is God who encourages me to strive for loving, creative and healing relationships in the community and with people. As I reflect daily on who God is, I’m motivated to work for a world that is just and caring.”

– Campbell Roberts (National Director, Salvation Army of New Zealand)

“God is the ground of my being. St John tells us that God is love , and those that abide in love abide in God and God in them.” Such life is demonstrated in the life of Jesus Christ in his total commitment to justice. Such love cannot be defeated. It is stronger, than hate, more powerful than death.”

– Rev Peter Beck, former Anglican dean of Christchurch and now Christchurch city councillor

“I find the question quite interesting: “What does God mean to you?”, rather than “Who is God for you?” For me personally, the word ‘God can be interchanged with many other words- Allah, Almighty being, creator of the universe…. I believe that a far greater being, ‘God; existed before all else. It is the Triune God – God, Son, Spirit that has a significant place in my daily life, and particularly the person of Jesus. Jesus, who is love, who came among us in the world to bring a simple message- to love one another as God loves us, an unconditional love that can never be measured. Such a simple message, but seemingly so hard to follow. It is the person of Jesus that I try to emulate each day, loving all those with whom I come into contact.”

– Sister Helen O’Sullivan, a missionary nun, is the national project co-ordinator for the Catholic Church’s office for young people.

“God centers around our Highest Thoughts and is supreme Goodness”
– a “nony mouse”
“It’s all about doing the most good. God manifests in the highest virtues, in action: things like helping one another, forgiveness, charity, humility, love, mercy, compassion and especially seeing the good, the very best in people. Love is more than an emotion – it is action
– “a writer”-
God plays a significant role in my life, and couldn’t be described in a short paragraph really.”
– anonymous reader

from Sunday Star-Times (NZ) Sunday April 8 2012

“Life is God’s novel. Let him write it.”
by Isaac Bashevis Singer

THE BIG QUESTION:

What does GOD mean to YOU?

“I experience God as an eternal loving creative presence within the world and in my own life, My belief  My belief in God provides me with a framework for how I view humanity and the earth,  God for me is found in the middle of daily life, in all the joys and struggles of people. It is God who encourages me to strive for loving, creative and healing relationships in the community and with people. As I reflect daily on who God is, I’m motivated to work for a world that is just and caring.”

– Campbell Roberts (National Director, Salvation Army of New Zealand)

“God is the ground of my being. St John tells us that God is love , and those that abide in love abide in God and God  in them.”  Such life is demonstrated in the life of Jesus Christ in his total commitment to justice. Such love cannot be defeated. It is stronger, than hate, more powerful than death.”

– Rev Peter Beck, former Anglican dean of Christchurch and now Christchurch city councillor

“I find the question quite interesting: “What does God mean to you?”, rather than “Who is God for you?” For me personally, the word ‘God can be interchanged  with many other words- Allah, Almighty being, creator of the universe…. I believe that a far greater  being, ‘God; existed before all else. It is the Triune God – God, Son, Spirit that has a significant place in my daily life, and particularly the person of Jesus. Jesus, who is love, who came among us in the world to bring a simple message- to love one another as God loves us, an unconditional love that can never be measured. Such a simple message, but seemingly so hard to follow. It is the person of Jesus that I try to emulate each day, loving all those with whom I come into contact.”

– Sister Helen O’Sullivan, a missionary nun, is the national project co-ordinator  for the Catholic Church’s office for young people.

*

” A location in one’s psyche (as well as externally), where the fullest concept of love reigns, leading to a calm and grounded way of meeting any situation. Like peace, God is always available to us; but can only exist when we choose this place , this never-ending source to dwell. This God-state lies deep within our nature, but requires deliberate cultivation (prayer, meditation) in the same way we have to hard to be healthy. And just like exercise, there are many paths to spirituality. Anyone who kills in the name of religion has lost God. This force unites and overcomes fear.”

– Jo Randerson, playwright, theatre director and performer, raised as an Anglican, but has a  strong interest in Buddhism and spiritual practices in general’.

“I’ve always accepted that there is a God and that provides me with a sense of security when times are adverse or appalling.”

– Michael Laws, radio host and former politician

“The death and resurrection of Christ, which is a single act and not two separate events, is the heartbeat of Christianity. It tells us God chooses a personal relationship of trust and sacrificial love with us. In short, God was in Christ reconciling Godself to humanity…and if we want to know what God looks like we need to go no further than gazing on the face of Jesus,

‘I came that you may have life… and have it abundantly’, says Jesus.”

– Bishop Victoria Matthews, Anglican Bishop of Christchurch

“As a follower of Islam, I believe in what the Koran says about God. The Koran is full of descriptions of God (Allah) throughout the text. God is the creator and sustainer of the Universe. He is merciful and  compassionate. There is nothing like Him, He is the all-hearing, the all seeing. He is the God, the everlasting refuge, who has not begotten, nor has been begotten. He is the guardian over everything. I believe characterising God in any human form or depicting Him as favouring certain individuals or nations on the basis of wealth, power or race is incorrect. He created humans as equals. They may distinguish themselves and get His favour through virtue and piety only.”

– Ashraf Choudry , former Labour MP from 2002-2011

A few quick thoughts from readers unknown…

“God is life force”

“God is another term/concept to explain life itself”

“For me God is Universal Consciousness, the Ground of All Being”

“God is the Creator…the Ultimate Creator of Life”

“God is the mystery of Life in the ‘great unknown'”

“I often think of God as the answer to a number of answerable questions.”

“God is the Ultimate , Infinite Source centering around our Highest Thoughts and is supreme Goodness”

– a “nony mouse”

“It’s all about doing the most good. God manifests in the highest virtues, in action:  things like helping one another, forgiveness, charity, humility, love, mercy, compassion and especially seeing the good, the very best in people. Love is more than an emotion – it is an action…and reveals itself most clearly, most fully in our actions to each other.”

– “a writer”

“God is a mystery, a Creative Presence, the mystery, the Ultimate Source of Life, the Fountain of all Goodness, Who/That allows me to be who I really want to be and become.”

– me

God plays a significant role in my life, and couldn’t be described in a short paragraph really.”

–  anonymous reader

from Sunday Star-Times (NZ) Sunday April 8 2012

Shared by craig

PPS

This is my favourite and sums up my message, my “little” life…in trying in some small way to break down barriers between people.

“I had a good chance to meet a yogi who was so spiritual and happy all the time. I wondered how he managed his thinking and I learned a lot from him. I saw him and I thought, ‘This is the way.’ You believe in a God, but not in a religious way. We human beings like to give him names, whether that is Jesus  or whatever else. But my view is that God is ONE, whether it is Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, almost anything, and that he is everywhere. He (or she) has (no gender), colour, no religion, no race, nothing. It’s incredible how close he is to you and to everybody. You just call him (her/It) and he’s there. That’s it, simple.  This is the reality we so often forget.”

– Balbir Singh, former physio-therapist to Michael Schumacher (and student of psychology). (With my little additional few words in brackets)  from a great book by Clyde Brolin ‘Overdrive: Formula One in the Zone’   http://www.overdrivef1.com   and my book ‘God and Formula One’ at http://www.amazon.com/GOD-FORMULA-ONE-F1-ebook/dp/B005Z6BFX0

“Together, one mind, one heart, one life at a time, today let’s plant the seeds, the hope of a  better and brighter future (for tomorrow)”

The various books that Craig ‘felt inspired to write’ are available at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4http://www.creativekiwis.com/books.html#craig or www.lulu.com/craiglock

All proceeds go to needy and underprivileged children – MINE!

The submitter’s blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at http://craigsblogs.wordpress.com

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s see how many people we can impact, encourage, empower, uplift and perhaps even inspire to reach their fullest potentials.”

It’s Always Darkest Before the Dawn

“Here was a light behind the despair, beyond the darkness. At first a flicker of an ember, just a tiny pin-prick of dawning possibilities. Then burning slowly, brightly and bigger, a glimmer, a candle in the blackness of despair, which gave off just enough of a glow (luminescence?) to light a path. And so show the rest of us the way ahead… a path to endless possibilities…from the darkness into the eternal light.” as adapted (slightly) from Rian Malan’s powerful words in ‘My Traitor’s Heart’

From “It’s Always Darkest Before the Dawn”

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B007IX0MNW

The various novels on South Africa that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4

“There is only one thing that has power completely, and that is love

“There is only one thing that has power completely, and that is love. Because when a man loves, he seeks no power, and therefore he has power. Only strive for power if it is not at the cost (expense) of other men (people). Power corrupts. You first have to be pure and righteous first before one can attain power. I believe that love is a greater force than power.

I see only one hope for our country, and that is when white men and black men, desiring neither power nor money, but desiring only the good of their country, come together to work for it. He was grave and silent, and then he said sombrely, I have one great fear in my heart, that one day when they are turned to loving, they will find we are turned to hating.”

Alan Paton: Cry the Beloved Country (first published 1948)
Penguin Books UK

“Do not be defined by the limits that hold us down; but by the opportunities (bright) that lie ahead”

“Do not be defined by the limits that hold us down; but by the opportunities (bright) that lie ahead”

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4

The BIG Question: What Does God Mean to YOU?

We human beings like to give him names, whether that is Jesus or whatever else. But my view is that God is ONE, whether it is Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, almost anything, and that he is everywhere. He (or she) has (no gender), colour, no religion, no race, nothing. It’s incredible how close he is to you and to everybody. You just call him (her/It) and he’s there. That’s it, simple. This is the reality we so often forget.”

“God is a mystery, a Creative Presence, the mystery, the Ultimate Source of Life, the Fountain of all Goodness, Who/That allows me to be who I really want to be and become.”

“God is a mystery, a Creative Presence, the mystery, the Ultimate Source of Life, the Fountain of all Goodness, Who/That allows me to be who I really want to be and become.”

This is my favourite and sums up my message, my ‘little’ life…in trying in some small way to break down barriers between people. “I had a good chance to meet a yogi who was so spiritual and happy all the time. I wondered how he managed his thinking and I learned a lot from him. I saw him and I thought, ‘This is the way.’ You believe in a God, but not in a religious way. We human beings like to give him names, whether that is Jesus or whatever else. But my view is that God is ONE, whether it is Christian, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, almost anything, and that he is everywhere. He (or she) has (no gender), colour, no religion, no race, nothing. It’s incredible how close he is to you and to everybody. You just call him (her/It) and he’s there. That’s it, simple. This is the reality we so often forget.” – Balbir Singh, former physio-therapist to Michael Schumacher (and student of psychology).

(With my little additional few words in brackets) from a great book by Clyde Brolin ‘Overdrive: Formula One in the Zone’ www.overdrivef1.com and God and Formula One http://www.amazon.com/GOD-FORMULA-ONE-F1-ebook/dp/B005Z6BFX0

Whilst we can (and should) cherish and celebrate our ‘unique’ differences, let not our different beliefs divide us, but let the Spirit of our shared humanity be what defines and unites us as common inhabitants of our planet.”.

“Together, one mind, one heart, one life at a time, one small step at a time, today let’s plant the seeds, the hope of a better and brighter future (for tomorrow)”

PPS

“God is a mystery, a Creative Presence, the mystery, the Ultimate Source of Life, the Fountain of all Goodness, Who/That allows me to be who I really want to be and become.”

“God is leading us to the light. What we learn in the darkness, we are to share in the eternal light.”

Picture (great by my friend, Jenny) from
Don’t worry about the world ending today…
 it’s already tomorrow in scenic and tranquil ‘little’ New Zealand

An Easter message: Rising Hope

In conquering death, Jesus shows us that extinction is not our evolutionary fate, because through him death is not the end of the road. Photo / Getty Images
Easter is the great event that lies at the very heart of the Christian faith, and if there is one word that encompasses this meaning and significance, that word is “hope”.
Hope has been hard-wired into the human psyche. Hope is not wishful thinking but the opposite of despair and cynicism. It is an instinctive knowing that good can overcome evil. It is possible to overcome the tragedy of loss and death, to struggle on against the odds, to overcome adversity, to achieve heroic deeds. Hope gives unexpected strength in those bleak and seemingly hopeless times when we experience loss and the letting go of security and health, and ultimately of our own lives.
An unknown author once wrote, Hope sees the invisible, feels the intangible, and achieves the impossible, and as Alexander Pope put it, Hope springs eternal in the human breast.

The secularised world does not offer answers. Neither does science. With all the growing understandings that science gives us about the origins and development of life, it does not and cannot answer our deep, personal search for meaning, or meet the yearning to love and be loved that is at the very essence of our humanity.
That great 4th century bishop St Augustine of Hippo put it like this. “Our hearts were made for You O Lord, and are ever restless until they rest in You.” There seems to be this deep chasm within every human heart.
Jesus Christ, God’s Son, in becoming human, revealed to us the generosity and altruism of God, and by the example of his own life he taught us how we, too, can follow in his footsteps. The loving God revealed to us by Jesus, is not a God who determines our value or destiny simply by tallying up our good deeds as the measure of a reward in eternal life. Instead, God loves us unconditionally and invites us to love both God and our neighbours in return. The cross upon which Jesus gave his life speaks more eloquently than any words of this unconditional love.
Easter celebrations recall Jesus’ Resurrection from death to life. In conquering death, Jesus shows us that extinction is not our evolutionary fate, because through him death is not the end of the road. It is another step on the journey to perfection, to everlasting life in the love and presence of God – our creator’s intended goal for humanity.
Through his resurrection, Jesus shows us that love is stronger than death. We need no longer be held prisoners in our own private darknesses of illness, futility, addiction and other forces that crush our spirits. Jesus has opened the doors in these dark places to the gentle healing and peace of our loving God.
A contemporary Christian writer, Rev Ronald Rolheiser, puts it like this:
“God never overpowers, never twists arms, never pushes your face into something so as to take away your freedom. God respects our freedom and is never a coercive force. Christ is risen, though we might not see him! We don’t always notice spring. The miraculous doesn’t force itself on us. It’s there, there to be seen, but whether we see or not, and what precisely we do see, depends mainly upon what’s going on inside our own hearts.”

An Easter message: Rising Hope

5:30 AM Thursday Apr 5, 2012

From: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10796782

 


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In conquering death, Jesus shows us that extinction is not our evolutionary fate, because through him death is not the end of the road. Photo / Getty Images

Easter is the great event that lies at the very heart of the Christian faith, and if there is one word that encompasses this meaning and significance, that word is “hope”.

Hope has been hard-wired into the human psyche. Hope is not wishful thinking but the opposite of despair and cynicism. It is an instinctive knowing that good can overcome evil. It is possible to overcome the tragedy of loss and death, to struggle on against the odds, to overcome adversity, to achieve heroic deeds. Hope gives unexpected strength in those bleak and seemingly hopeless times when we experience loss and the letting go of security and health, and ultimately of our own lives.

An unknown author once wrote, Hope sees the invisible, feels the intangible, and achieves the impossible, and as Alexander Pope put it, Hope springs eternal in the human breast.

We have seen for ourselves in recent months how hope rebuilds broken lives and broken cities. We think of the amazing and heart-warming accounts of the hope that brought people in Christchurch through those terrible times in the immediate aftermath of the earthquakes; the hope that supported the victims who were trapped, and hope on the part of the rescue teams.

http://data.apn.co.nz/apnnz/hserver/SITE=NZH/AREA=SEC.NATIONAL.STY/CHA=NATIONAL/SS=NATIONAL/S1=OPINION/S2=RELIGIONANDBELIEFS/S3=NONE/S4=NONE/S5=NONE/HB=SPORT.SPORT.SPORT.SPORT.NATIONAL/SCW=1440/SCH=900/WLOC=none/WH=22/WL=13/WC=fine/AS=NONE/VT=NONE/VV=NONE/VP=NONE/size=RECTANGLE/SA=1/SR=1/POS=2/random=7025238422/viewid=31399923321/KEYWORD=easter+message+rising+hope+opinion+religion+beliefs+great+event+lies+heart+christian+faith+word+encompasses+meaning+significance+hard+wired+human+psyche+wishful+thinking+opposite+despair+cynicism+instinctive+knowing+good+overcome+evil
From time immemorial hope has been understood and expressed in many forms. Long before the advent of Christianity, many civilisations had stories or images to express the concept of hope. As far back as the 5th century BC, the mythical phoenix was presented as a symbol of rebirth, immortality, and renewal. It is found in many cultures – a bird that perished in a fire that burned it to ashes, from which a new, young phoenix arose reborn, to live again. This story is found in ancient Greek, Persian and Egyptian cultures and there are variations of it in Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Russian history as well.

For 2000 years Christians have opened their hearts to a different kind of hope built on the real and tangible life and death and resurrection of the person of Jesus Christ. It is an assured hope that addresses the longings of the human heart for meaning and purpose and answers the seemingly overwhelming questions about who we are, why we exist and what are our origins and destiny.

Today’s world, perhaps more than at any other time, is overwhelmed by anxiety. We fear nuclear destruction; we experience wars, diseases and famines as well as the reality of economic insecurity and the breakdown of long-held values. In Auckland this anxiety confronts us every time we go online, tune into radio or television or open our newspapers and for so many, in the rawness of daily life. It is not surprising that a sense of hopelessness is pervasive, especially among young people.

The secularised world does not offer answers. Neither does science. With all the growing understandings that science gives us about the origins and development of life, it does not and cannot answer our deep, personal search for meaning, or meet the yearning to love and be loved that is at the very essence of our humanity.

That great 4th century bishop St Augustine of Hippo put it like this. “Our hearts were made for You O Lord, and are ever restless until they rest in You.” There seems to be this deep chasm within every human heart.

Jesus Christ, God’s Son, in becoming human, revealed to us the generosity and altruism of God, and by the example of his own life he taught us how we, too, can follow in his footsteps. The loving God revealed to us by Jesus, is not a God who determines our value or destiny simply by tallying up our good deeds as the measure of a reward in eternal life. Instead, God loves us unconditionally and invites us to love both God and our neighbours in return. The cross upon which Jesus gave his life speaks more eloquently than any words of this unconditional love.

Easter celebrations recall Jesus’ Resurrection from death to life. In conquering death, Jesus shows us that extinction is not our evolutionary fate, because through him death is not the end of the road. It is another step on the journey to perfection, to everlasting life in the love and presence of God – our creator’s intended goal for humanity.

Through his resurrection, Jesus shows us that love is stronger than death. We need no longer be held prisoners in our own private darknesses of illness, futility, addiction and other forces that crush our spirits. Jesus has opened the doors in these dark places to the gentle healing and peace of our loving God.

A contemporary Christian writer, Rev Ronald Rolheiser, puts it like this:

“God never overpowers, never twists arms, never pushes your face into something so as to take away your freedom. God respects our freedom and is never a coercive force. Christ is risen, though we might not see him! We don’t always notice spring. The miraculous doesn’t force itself on us. It’s there, there to be seen, but whether we see or not, and what precisely we do see, depends mainly upon what’s going on inside our own hearts.”

You are invited to share in Easter worship with a church in your local community.

The church leaders

Rev Dr Neville Bartle, National Superintendent, Church of the Nazarene.
Rt Rev Ross Bay, Anglican Bishop of Auckland.
Pastor Tak Bhana, Senior Pastor, Church Unlimited.
Rev Norman Brookes, Auckland District Superintendent, Methodist Church of New Zealand.
Rev Murray Cottle, Regional Consultant, Auckland Baptist Churches.
Pastor Paul de Jong, Senior Pastor, LIFE.
Most Rev Patrick Dunn, Catholic Bishop of Auckland.
Mr Peter Eccles, Auckland District Chairman, Congregational Union of New Zealand.
Mr David Goold, on behalf of Open Brethren churches.
Pastor Mike Griffiths, National Leader, Elim Churches of New Zealand.
Pastor Ken Harrison, Senior Pastor, Harvest Christian Church, Papakura AOGNZ.
Pastor Dr Brian Hughes, Senior Pastor, Calvary Chapel.
Rev Fakaofo Kaia, Moderator Northern Presbytery, Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand.
Very Rev Jo Kelly-Moore, Dean, Auckland Cathedral of the Holy Trinity.
Rev Dr John Kirkpatrick, Senior Pastor, Greenlane Christian Centre.
Rev Andrew Marshall, National Director, Alliance Churches of New Zealand.
Pastor Bruce Monk, National Leader, Acts Churches NZ.
Pastor Sam Monk, Senior Pastor, Equippers Church.
Pastor Peter Mortlock, Senior Pastor, City Impact Church.
Pastor Lloyd Rankin, National Director, Vineyard Churches Aotearoa New Zealand.
Major Heather Rodwell, Divisional Commander, The Salvation Army.
Bishop Brian Tamaki, Destiny Churches.
Pastor Eddie Tupa’i, President, North New Zealand Conference, Seventh-Day Adventist Church.
Rev Dr Richard Waugh, National Superintendent, Wesleyan Methodist Church of New Zealand.
Mr Glyn Carpenter, National Director, NZ Christian Network.

From: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10796782